Posts Tagged Mental health practice

The seeds of my recovery: A new community and a little Scotswoman

The seeds of my recovery: A new community and a little Scotswoman

‘I am not sure when it happened.
 
But at some time between naming the dream, and starting to work towards it, in a myriad of tiny little ways, the dream began to take hold of my heart. It transformed from a joke into a deep motivation.
 
I wanted to do this. Kaz would help me to do this. I could do this.’
 
How the seeds of my recovery began to take hold after I went to a community-managed mental health service.

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Just keep typing: A night of madness

Just keep typing: A night of madness

What is it like to lose yourself in suicidal urges? And how do the police and mental health system respond? Read about one night when I got lost in my madness and was on the edge of suicide, and what happened over that evening and the following day.
 
This article draws on actual journal entries. It may be triggering for some people to read.

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When I went down the rabbit hole: My beginnings of madness

When I went down the rabbit hole: My beginnings of madness

A first admission to a psychiatric ward is a startling experience. I am not sure that anyone ever expects to end up in the ‘looney bin’. Certainly I didn’t. This is a place reserved for other people, for properly crazy people.
 
As it turned out, most of my fellow patients were far removed from stereotypical nutters themselves. We crazy folks have many experiences and talents, but none of them sufficient to keep us out of the ward. I was to meet mathematicians, artists, musicians, an admiral, and several versions of Jesus. Mostly people were disappointingly and comfortingly normal.
 
Read this reflection on some of my first experiences of madness, and my first stay in a psychiatric hospital.

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Talking about trauma can feel really, really hard. But it can get easier.

Talking about trauma can feel really, really hard. But it can get easier.

The ordinary response to atrocities is to banish them from consciousness. Certain violations of the social compact are too terrible to utter aloud: this is the meaning of the word unspeakable. – Judith Herman, 1992 Over my years of working in mental health services to promote trauma informed practice, many professionals have expressed surprise – sometimes even disbelief – about the exceptionally high rates of trauma prevalence amongst people diagnosed with mental health conditions. They tell me that hardly any of their clients ever talk about trauma. Some tell me that they already ask their clients about trauma, but people […]

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